Anonymous asked
Dear Literary Viking: So I sent a query with the wrong word count to a Foreword lit. agent (inserted an extra number: 94,000 words becomes 945,000 words). What's the best way to let an agent know you're not trying to make them gouge out their eyes? Also I know that queries have to be perfect, so should I just leave it alone and try someone else? Thank you!

I would send a omg typo email.

christinamq asked
Is it appropriate to email an agent when you aren't 100% clear in their submission process?

Their submission policy should be on their website.

I am going to start swearing by authors

vyrenrolar:

superwhatlocked:

becca-morley:

thepreciousthing:

thecoffeetragedy:

flippyspoon:

dragonsigma:

"Holy mother of Mary Shelley!"

"What the Tolkien?"

"By Victor Hugo’s spare underpants!"

"Jesus, Mary and Joseph Conrad!"

"Pardon my Molière, but I don’t give a Faulkner."

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Thank you supernatural fandom

OH MY ROWLING

Anonymous asked
Can I submit to more than one Foreword agent at a time? (I could swear I've seen this answered somewhere before, but my Google skills are failing me and I can't find info about it on your site.)

No, but you can submit to another after one has passed. We don’t take too long with our queries usually.

Anonymous asked
I was the one who asked about the writing on the net. I had submitted it to the site and it was accepted. I just came across it and realized I wanted to complete the story and possibly turn it into a full length novel. I was concerned it would be a problem that some of it was already on the internet.

I get this question a lot and the only real answer is ‘possibly’. There’s no precedent really and now with Wattpad and the like it is more acceptable. 

venitaspeaks:

mcsars:

It’s hard to look stately when your baby is having a moment, but Prince William does alright.

I love them, omg. Look at the babby!

(Source: obsessedwiththeroyals)

theparisreview:

                        five years old,he sees more than he knows, but likes the mysteryof fondness, and the nothing in his dream
that might be everything he cannot telland might be what it seems: that private gameof making good, and owing no one nothing.
—John Burnside, from “Nothing.”Photography: Kin Chan.

theparisreview:

                        five years old,
he sees more than he knows, but likes the mystery
of fondness, and the nothing in his dream

that might be everything he cannot tell
and might be what it seems: that private game
of making good, and owing no one nothing.

John Burnside, from “Nothing.”
Photography: Kin Chan.

Anonymous asked
I recently found some writing of mine that was published on a website. It was only about two chapters worth of what could potentially be a book. Because it's on the net, does that hurt my chancesif I do finish the book?

I don’t understand how your writing got on a website without you knowing about it… I’d be more upset about that.